Rights Respecting Schools

Welcome to our Rights Respecting School page.

Becoming a Rights Respecting School means that we care about children’s rights and we try and make sure that all children get their rights at school.  We focus on the rights that are set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). You can read a summary of the UNCRC HERE.

We think it is important to understand and promote children’s rights because we want all children to use their rights fully.  We want to work to help children in our school and  all around the world to use their rights.

This page is written by us, the Rights Ambassadors.  We are a group of children from years 3,4,5 and 6 who are leading the school to become a Rights Respecting School.  Some of the things that we are doing are:  making posters to put around the school, running charity events, doing assemblies for children in school and meetings for parents.  Every half term we learn about a different right as a whole school.

This year we have worked on the following rights:

 

Article 28 – the right to education

We learnt about children in other countries who don’t have an education, especially girls.  We thought about how important education is and how lucky we are to have education.

 

Article 2 – the right to non- discrimination

We held “Friendship Friday” when everyone wore different clothes and celebrated our differences.  We talked about everyone having the right to be treated fairly and equally, regardless of what they look like, how they act, what language they speak, whether they are a boy or a girl, where they are from, what religion they are or any other factor.

 

The right to be safe

We talked about being safe at home, at school and on the roads.  We reminded children about using TAG and standing up for their right to be safe.  We talked about not using the word “snitch” in our school, and instead standing up for your right to be safe by being a “truth teller”.  We set up a safety box for children to put any concerns in.  We thought about children in other countries who are not safe and we chose to raise money for children in Syria through a cake sale and a non-uniform day.

 

Articles 12 and 13 – the right to be heard

We talked about the different ways that children’s views are listened to at school and at home.  At school we do questionnaires, have Rights Ambassadors, Digital Ambassadors, Library Ambassadors and Lunchtime Ambassadors.  In classrooms children get lots of opportunities to talk about their learning through learning partners and class discussions.  Children also can speak to adults privately if they are worried about anything, or put a note in the Talk Time or Safety Box.

 

Article 29 – the aim of education to learn about respect for the environment

Rights Ambassadors set up a competition to make a model out of recycled materials and held a charity day called “Go Green Day” to raise money for the World Wildlife Fund.  Lots of classes raised money to adopt animals through the WWF.

 

Article 24 – the right to be healthy

This half term we are thinking about the right to be healthy.  We have thought about children in other countries who don’t have clean water and nutritious food.  In lots of classes their topics are about keeping healthy, so children are learning about how to be healthy.

 

We think RRS has made a huge difference to our school.  It has

  • taught children about their rights
  • made children understand how important education is and now children work harder
  • made children behave in a more respectful way to one another
  • made children more aware of their right to be safe. They are more likely to say something if they feel unsafe and use TAG to deal with problems.
  • reduced bullying and almost got rid of the word “snitch”
  • made children more confident in expressing their views.
  • helped us to set up Ambassadors, so that children make decisions about things in school
  • educated children about the need to look after our environment